SALAD DAYS: A DECADE OF PUNK IN WASHINGTON, DC (1980-90)

In the not so distant past before the internet ruined everything (I kid, sorta), every music genre had its local scene and city. Grunge, you think of the Pacific Northwest. Hippie dippy, San Francisco was the groovy spot to be in. Hair metal bands, Los Angeles for sure, totally. The list goes on of course, but the one place that was pumping out high energy tracks that spoke to me was Washington D.C. and its Punk Rock scene during the 80’s. Maybe I’m slightly biased having grown up just a few hours south of D.C., but the punk scene that was born in the District of Columbia influenced me heavily. From playing in punk bands to getting into graphic design, D.C. was my mecca. Salad Days: A Decade of Punk in Washington D.C. (1980-90) provides a glimpse into the DIY punk scene in the Nation’s Capital. Bands such as Bad Brains, Minor Threat, Fugazi, Rites of Spring, Jawbox, and Dag Nasty all called D.C. home. Dischord Records, also born of D.C., was the one label that pulled it all together and influenced many bands for years to come including a little band called Nirvana (Dave Grohl played in hardcore bands while growing up in the D.C. suburbs of Virginia). The photos and old show footage in this film bring back some great memories of playing shows, making flyers and stickers, seeing bands in dark and dingy basements, the (old) 9:30 Club, and Black Cat. Those were my salad days.

www.saladdaysdc.com

Ron Thompson

Hailing from Virginia Beach, Ron did some time in NYC before calling the city of Angels his home back in 2005. A man of eclectic interests, he’s played drums in punk bands, designs and sews pillow covers, rides his bike over driving at all costs, and travels the world as much as possible in search of visual & edible inspiration. Most of his time is now spent as designer and creative director running ITAL/C Studio with Matt.

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